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Thursday 17 January 2019
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Roadside “beggars” put to work

While the world had its eyes turned to global migration in commemoration of world social justice day last month, the escalating unemployment rate in Namibia has forced thousands of job seekers to the roadside begging for jobs.
With over 60 000 jobs lost last year and the unemployment rate fast-approaching 40%, this publication engaged the MSR organisation to get a glimpse on some of the local initiatives geared towards job creation for unskilled and semi-skilled Namibians.
According to MSR Training & PR Coordinator, Hilya Kambanda the organisation originated to ensure social justice was in place when it comes to employer-employee relations and it is doing its part with addressing unemployment challenges in the country.
“MSR was originally started for the men sitting on the side of the road who landed there because of their migration to urban areas in the hope of finding a job.
However, we now cater for all unemployed people, including women who have not received vocational training, grade 10 and 12 dropouts as well as people who never had a chance at any form of formal education.
Hence we aim to provide a barrier that would prevent exploitation of both employee and employer which is what social justice is” said Kambanda.
The MSR was established in 2007 and registered as a welfare organisation with the Ministry of Health and SWhile the world had its eyes turned to global migration in commemoration of world social justice day last month, the escalating unemployment rate in Namibia has forced thousands of job seekers to the roadside begging for jobs.
With over 60 000 jobs lost last year and the unemployment rate fast-approaching 40%, this publication engaged the MSR organisation to get a glimpse on some of the local initiatives geared towards job creation for unskilled and semi-skilled Namibians.
According to MSR Training & PR Coordinator, Hilya Kambanda the organisation originated to ensure social justice was in place when it comes to employer-employee relations and it is doing its part with addressing unemployment challenges in the country.
“MSR was originally started for the men sitting on the side of the road who landed there because of their migration to urban areas in the hope of finding a job.
However, we now cater for all unemployed people, including women who have not received vocational training, grade 10 and 12 dropouts as well as people who never had a chance at any form of formal education.
Hence we aim to provide a barrier that would prevent exploitation of both employee and employer which is what social justice is” said Kambanda.
The MSR was established in 2007 and registered as a welfare organisation with the Ministry of Health and Social Services that provides support to unemployed people, through connecting them to training and job opportunities.
To be registered with MSR, one must apply and attend workshops in life skills and money management. After completion participants are then awarded MSR membership cards for identification purposes to prospective employers. Since its inception the MSR has built a database of at least 1302 registered job seekers, 337 have been assisted through vocational training, 560 were placed into part time jobs while 280 are now employed fulltime.
The organization has also expanded its reach to Erongo Region with an office in Swakopmund.
The organisation is appealing for continuous partnership and support from government, the private sector and the broader Namibian society.
“Anyone can choose to be change agents in the lives of these unemployed and unskilled people so besides funding for the running of the organisation and a variety of training projects, partnerships are needed for different activities ranging from in-kind services needed by the organisation in terms of capacity building and office space” urged Kambanda.
Gida Sekandi, Chairperson of the MSR Board also motivated that the MSR is doing its part in addressing unemployment challenges in the country.
“This is our way of making an impact to connect training opportunities with job creation for those who would otherwise not have this type of access”, she added.
ocial Services that provides support to unemployed people, through connecting them to training and job opportunities.
To be registered with MSR, one must apply and attend workshops in life skills and money management. After completion participants are then awarded MSR membership cards for identification purposes to prospective employers. Since its inception the MSR has built a database of at least 1302 registered job seekers, 337 have been assisted through vocational training, 560 were placed into part time jobs while 280 are now employed fulltime.
The organization has also expanded its reach to Erongo Region with an office in Swakopmund.
The organisation is appealing for continuous partnership and support from government, the private sector and the broader Namibian society.
“Anyone can choose to be change agents in the lives of these unemployed and unskilled people so besides funding for the running of the organisation and a variety of training projects, partnerships are needed for different activities ranging from in-kind services needed by the organisation in terms of capacity building and office space” urged Kambanda.
Gida Sekandi, Chairperson of the MSR Board also motivated that the MSR is doing its part in addressing unemployment challenges in the country.
“This is our way of making an impact to connect training opportunities with job creation for those who would otherwise not have this type of access”, she added.




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