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Friday 18 January 2019
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The two sides of the NBL sponsorship coin

NNBLamibians have come out strong with some being bitter over Namibia Breweries Limited’s (NBL) announcement to sponsor the Griquas Rugby Club in South Africa and others defending the Tafel Lager brand saying it is a business move.
The NBL announced this week that the Tafel Lager brand will now be on the jerseys of South African lads. The sponsorship has acquired the Talef Lager brand the naming rights of the Griqualand West Rugby Stadium in Kimberley as well as the naming rights to the team, which will henceforth be known as the Tafel Lager Griquas.
Of the many who came out strong against the move, opposition political party DTA issued a statement expressing their utter disappointment with the Ohlthaver & List Group.
“It is unacceptable and quite frankly disgusting that the Ohlthaver & List Group would decide to invest in sport in South Africa instead of Namibia,” read the statement authored by Nico Smit.
Smit added that despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of what is consumed in Namibia is produced in and imported from South Africa, South African businesses exporting to and active in Namibia spend virtually nothing on any form of development initiatives in Namibia that amounts to real socio-economic advancement or upliftmend of the majority of Namibians.
“As such, I find it difficult to comprehend how the Ohlthaver & List Group could come to such a decision despite to say that it is a symptom of the colonial mentality, it is white owned monopoly capital in Namibia supporting their colonial masters in South Africa.”
“It goes without saying that the decision by the Ohlthaver & List Group to engage in this sponsorship deal is entirely selfish in nature. It was never meant to benefit Namibian society at large or Namibian sport, but rather it will benefit South Africans and the handful of executives at the Ohlthaver & List Group who have revealed themselves as unpatriotic as can be.”
Sharing the same sentiments with Smit is local coach Woody Jacobs who said it is a slap in the face of Namibians. Jacobs said it is unfortunate and hurting to learn that a Namibian company decided to sponsor a foreign club while the underfunded sport fraternity at home continues to limp.
“Charity starts at home. The Namibia Premier League (NPL) only needed N$9 million to take the players off the streets. We shop in South African shops here but they do not sponsor us. Tafel is drank by so many Namibians so we expect at least the favour in return,” said Jacobs.
Currently, Tafel Lager is the maiden sponsor of the Brave Warriors, but Jacobs feels it is not enough. “Products of the Brave Warriors come from the NPL. So they are sponsoring finished products but what about the raw products on the grass-root level?”
Jacobs is of the opinion that Namibians have become too tolerant of companies making decisions that do not benefit Namibians. “They brought Didier Drogba in 2015 as if we did not have a Frankie Fredericks, Hitman Moses or a Harry Simon who are soil legends. We should really stop with this things,” he said.
Those in support of the sponsorship have made reference to the dismantled administration of local sport houses as a key reason why sponsors invest in safer grounds. Jacobs’ analysis of the other side of the coin is that it is an eye-opener and a lesson for local sport administration to up their game.

There is nothing wrong
From the rings of boxing Nestor Tobias said there is nothing wrong with the decision as it is simply business. He urges locals to work as hard in order to convince potential sponsors to invest in them. “There is nothing wrong with the decision. It is just business. We simply need to work hard and convince sponsors to also sponsor us,” said Tobias.
Blowing the same whistle is Sport, Youth and National Service Deputy Minister Agnes Tjongarero who said NBL’s move is indeed a good thing. Tjongarero aligned her reasons of supporting the move on the business perspective and the growth of the brand. “It is good that they are expanding their horizons. A lot of people will be employed and it means more income for the company.”
Making reference to the Brave Warriors sponsorship, Tjongarero said that the brand has done their part at home and cannot be blamed if the grounds are not attractive to investment.
“Many people will ask why the NBL is not supporting soccer but we need to look at things deeper. It is not the Breweries fault that soccer is in the state that it is. Why is it that the rugby ship is not sinking with a few sponsors but the football ship is sinking, even with support from MTC and others? So we need to change the way we do things and the way we think,” said Tjongarero.

NBL defends stance
Regardless of the opinion of the public, the NBL believes that the three-year sponsorship comes at an opportune time for Tafel Lager to expand and strengthen its footprint into the export market and eventually increase its sales in South Africa.
From a marketing and growth perspective, NBL said they identified the opportunity to bring the brand even closer to the South African consumer, by further strengthening its visibility, creating unique consumer experiences and associating the brand with a loved Northern Province rugby team.
In the dust of complaints from some in the public, NBL Global Marketing Manager, Rene Duffy said that the sponsorship paves the way for Namibian rugby to shine in the international arena through the exchange of rugby players between the two countries. “NBL’s support of rugby – a game enjoyed by millions of fans across the globe is also our way of expressing our gratitude to South Africa for welcoming and embracing Namibian rugby into the Currie Cup and the South African rugby arena in general,” said Duffy.
Duffy adds; “We are particularly excited about the reciprocal approach of this sponsorship contract, which will see a stronger partnership between Namibian and South African rugby, in the hope of achieving positive growth for both countries.”
Responding to further complaints, the Group’s Corporate Affairs Director Gideon Shilongo the move to spread the brand is aimed at celebrating Tafel Lager just as Windhoek Lager has become a globally consumed beer. “What many people may not have realized, is that in order to establish Windhoek Lager’s global presence, continuous and extensive investments were made into penetrating the markets where Windhoek Lager is consumed today. Brand investment is a prerequisite to creating demand for one’s brand when seeking to penetrate any market,” said Shilongo.
Shilongo continued to say that they move to sponsor the South African team was supported by an extensive research that identified opportunities to build the brand in that country.
He said the research identified rugby as a sport that not only enjoys extensive appeal across a wide consumer segment, but also presents the Tafel brand with opportunities to connect with consumers.
“It is within this context, and we are confident, that the Griqua Rugby Union sponsorship will serve as investment to connect South African consumers to Tafel Lager through association with their favourite sport, Rugby.
This is not an unpatriotic move, but in fact a great opportunity to establish our much loved Tafel Lager so that it follows in the footsteps of Windhoek Lager’s success.”
“It is also important to note that our commitment to Namibia, our home market, is in no way affected by this investment in one of our key export markets.”amibians have come out strong with some being bitter over Namibia Breweries Limited’s (NBL) announcement to sponsor the Griquas Rugby Club in South Africa and others defending the Tafel Lager brand saying it is a business move.
The NBL announced this week that the Tafel Lager brand will now be on the jerseys of South African lads. The sponsorship has acquired the Talef Lager brand the naming rights of the Griqualand West Rugby Stadium in Kimberley as well as the naming rights to the team, which will henceforth be known as the Tafel Lager Griquas.
Of the many who came out strong against the move, opposition political party DTA issued a statement expressing their utter disappointment with the Ohlthaver & List Group.
“It is unacceptable and quite frankly disgusting that the Ohlthaver & List Group would decide to invest in sport in South Africa instead of Namibia,” read the statement authored by Nico Smit.
Smit added that despite the fact that an overwhelming majority of what is consumed in Namibia is produced in and imported from South Africa, South African businesses exporting to and active in Namibia spend virtually nothing on any form of development initiatives in Namibia that amounts to real socio-economic advancement or upliftmend of the majority of Namibians.
“As such, I find it difficult to comprehend how the Ohlthaver & List Group could come to such a decision despite to say that it is a symptom of the colonial mentality, it is white owned monopoly capital in Namibia supporting their colonial masters in South Africa.”
“It goes without saying that the decision by the Ohlthaver & List Group to engage in this sponsorship deal is entirely selfish in nature. It was never meant to benefit Namibian society at large or Namibian sport, but rather it will benefit South Africans and the handful of executives at the Ohlthaver & List Group who have revealed themselves as unpatriotic as can be.”
Sharing the same sentiments with Smit is local coach Woody Jacobs who said it is a slap in the face of Namibians. Jacobs said it is unfortunate and hurting to learn that a Namibian company decided to sponsor a foreign club while the underfunded sport fraternity at home continues to limp.
“Charity starts at home. The Namibia Premier League (NPL) only needed N$9 million to take the players off the streets. We shop in South African shops here but they do not sponsor us. Tafel is drank by so many Namibians so we expect at least the favour in return,” said Jacobs.
Currently, Tafel Lager is the maiden sponsor of the Brave Warriors, but Jacobs feels it is not enough. “Products of the Brave Warriors come from the NPL. So they are sponsoring finished products but what about the raw products on the grass-root level?”
Jacobs is of the opinion that Namibians have become too tolerant of companies making decisions that do not benefit Namibians. “They brought Didier Drogba in 2015 as if we did not have a Frankie Fredericks, Hitman Moses or a Harry Simon who are soil legends. We should really stop with this things,” he said.
Those in support of the sponsorship have made reference to the dismantled administration of local sport houses as a key reason why sponsors invest in safer grounds. Jacobs’ analysis of the other side of the coin is that it is an eye-opener and a lesson for local sport administration to up their game.

There is nothing wrong
From the rings of boxing Nestor Tobias said there is nothing wrong with the decision as it is simply business. He urges locals to work as hard in order to convince potential sponsors to invest in them. “There is nothing wrong with the decision. It is just business. We simply need to work hard and convince sponsors to also sponsor us,” said Tobias.
Blowing the same whistle is Sport, Youth and National Service Deputy Minister Agnes Tjongarero who said NBL’s move is indeed a good thing. Tjongarero aligned her reasons of supporting the move on the business perspective and the growth of the brand. “It is good that they are expanding their horizons. A lot of people will be employed and it means more income for the company.”
Making reference to the Brave Warriors sponsorship, Tjongarero said that the brand has done their part at home and cannot be blamed if the grounds are not attractive to investment.
“Many people will ask why the NBL is not supporting soccer but we need to look at things deeper. It is not the Breweries fault that soccer is in the state that it is. Why is it that the rugby ship is not sinking with a few sponsors but the football ship is sinking, even with support from MTC and others? So we need to change the way we do things and the way we think,” said Tjongarero.

NBL defends stance
Regardless of the opinion of the public, the NBL believes that the three-year sponsorship comes at an opportune time for Tafel Lager to expand and strengthen its footprint into the export market and eventually increase its sales in South Africa.
From a marketing and growth perspective, NBL said they identified the opportunity to bring the brand even closer to the South African consumer, by further strengthening its visibility, creating unique consumer experiences and associating the brand with a loved Northern Province rugby team.
In the dust of complaints from some in the public, NBL Global Marketing Manager, Rene Duffy said that the sponsorship paves the way for Namibian rugby to shine in the international arena through the exchange of rugby players between the two countries. “NBL’s support of rugby – a game enjoyed by millions of fans across the globe is also our way of expressing our gratitude to South Africa for welcoming and embracing Namibian rugby into the Currie Cup and the South African rugby arena in general,” said Duffy.
Duffy adds; “We are particularly excited about the reciprocal approach of this sponsorship contract, which will see a stronger partnership between Namibian and South African rugby, in the hope of achieving positive growth for both countries.”
Responding to further complaints, the Group’s Corporate Affairs Director Gideon Shilongo the move to spread the brand is aimed at celebrating Tafel Lager just as Windhoek Lager has become a globally consumed beer. “What many people may not have realized, is that in order to establish Windhoek Lager’s global presence, continuous and extensive investments were made into penetrating the markets where Windhoek Lager is consumed today. Brand investment is a prerequisite to creating demand for one’s brand when seeking to penetrate any market,” said Shilongo.
Shilongo continued to say that they move to sponsor the South African team was supported by an extensive research that identified opportunities to build the brand in that country.
He said the research identified rugby as a sport that not only enjoys extensive appeal across a wide consumer segment, but also presents the Tafel brand with opportunities to connect with consumers.
“It is within this context, and we are confident, that the Griqua Rugby Union sponsorship will serve as investment to connect South African consumers to Tafel Lager through association with their favourite sport, Rugby.
This is not an unpatriotic move, but in fact a great opportunity to establish our much loved Tafel Lager so that it follows in the footsteps of Windhoek Lager’s success.”
“It is also important to note that our commitment to Namibia, our home market, is in no way affected by this investment in one of our key export markets.”




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